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Archive | Startegies for successful writing

St. Sebastian. martyr.Telling the truth!

Do not waffle in telling the truth.

Certainly, the memoir writer has permission “not to waffle,” but there is more that is incumbent on the writer. S/he has the obligation not to waffle. As memoir writers, “not to waffle” means to tell our truth about what happened. This is a must. Over the years, I have been amazed at how I can […]

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The Memoir Network

How to Write a Book – An Interview with Libby Atwater, Part 2

Here’s the second half of my recent discussion with Libby Atwater who began telling people’s stories professionally after a career in education. As a writer and editor, she has worked for individuals, families, businesses, nonprofits, universities, and community newspapers. Tales from her life have been published in several anthologies. Her memoir What Lies Within covers […]

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The Memoir Network

How to Write a Book – An Interview with Libby Atwater, Part 1

Here’s a recent discussion we had with Libby Atwater who began telling people’s stories professionally after a career in education. As a writer and editor, she has worked for individuals, families, businesses, nonprofits, universities, and community newspapers. Tales from her life have been published in several anthologies. Her memoir What Lies Within covers her first […]

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A First Step to Becoming a Disciplined Writer

Becoming a disciplined writer is a practice. Do you struggle with becoming a disciplined writer on a regular basis and do you wish you could be more focused? Do you ask yourself, “Why is it so hard to write when I really do want to write?” You have to decide to become a disciplined writer

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The Memoir Network

Writing About Family Stories You Don’t Agree With

How do you write about family stories whose interpretation you don’t agree with? We may all have family stories that we feel are wrongly told. When you distort your insights in order not to contradict other people’s take on your story—to “make nice,” your readers will sense that something is wrong.

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